Spider Mites

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Mites are common pests in landscapes and gardens that feed on many fruit trees, vines, berries, vegetables, and ornamental plants. Although related to insects, mites aren’t insects but members of the arachnid class along with spiders and ticks. Spider mites, also called webspinning mites, are the most common mite pests and among the most…(Read More)

Aphids

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Aphids (Aphidoidea) feed on the sap tissue using a proboscis. They produce enormous amounts of honeydew as their waste. Honeydew produces a sticky film on and underneath infested trees. Due to their feeding on sap tissue, they are easily controlled by systemic insecticides. Aphids do not need to mate, and are essentially born pregnant. Because…(Read More)

Redgum Lerp Psyllid

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The redgum lerp psyllid (Glycaspis brimblecombei) was originally from Australia. It was found in Los Angeles in 1998 and has spread throughout much of California since then. It also occurs in Arizona, Florida, Hawaii, and Mexico on a variety of eucalyptus. IDENTIFICATION Psyllids are plant-juice sucking insect in the insect family Psyllidae. Redgum lerp…(Read More)

Avocado Lace Bug

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The avocado lace bug, Pseudacysta perseae, occurs in the Caribbean, French Guyana, Mexico, and southeastern United States. As of 2006 it only appears in San Diego County. This bug is also known as the camphor lace bug, because it feeds on certain plants in the family Lauraceae. Hosts are the avocado fruit tree, other Persea…(Read More)

Diaprepes Root Weevil

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The Diaprepes root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus (L.), is a large, colorful weevil, 3/8 to 3/4 inch (10 to 19 mm) long, with numerous forms, or morphs, ranging from gray to yellow to orange and black. Because of its broad host range, the Diaprepes root weevil poses a great threat to the citrus, avocado…(Read More)

Longhorned Borer Beetles

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Two closely related species of longhorned borer beetles are known to attack eucalyptus trees in California. Phoracantha semipunctata, is native to Australia, was introduced into Southern California in the 1980s. It rapidly became a pest and now appears throughout the state wherever eucalyptus trees grow. Natural enemies were introduced from Australia, and biological control combined…(Read More)

Citrus leafminer

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Citrus leafminer larvae feed by creating shallow tunnels, or mines, in young leaves of citrus trees. The pest is most commonly found on citrus (oranges, mandarins, lemons, limes, grapefruit, and other varieties) and closely related plants (kumquat and calamondin). The citrus leafminer is the only mining insect that commonly attacks citrus leaves. Citrus leafminer, Phyllocnistis…(Read More)

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

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The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys, is an exotic insect new to North America. Large numbers of adult BMSB were first identified in fall 2001 in Allentown, PA; however, undetermined sightings likely date as far back as 1996. This Asian native, sometimes called the yel­low-brown or East Asian stink bug, has…(Read More)

Asian Longhorned Beetle

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The Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, is native to China and Korea, and was first discovered in the United States in 1996 on Long Island, New York. This insect poses a serious threat to healthy trees in the States. Frequently transported crates from Asia or elsewhere have them hiding in the wood packing materials. In…(Read More)

Asian citrus psyllid

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The Asian Citrus Psyllid is an aphid-like insect that feeds on the leaves and stems of citrus trees and other citrus-like plants. Its real danger lies in that it can be a carrier of a deadly, bacterial tree disease called Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as Citrus Greening Disease. Psyllids nymphs are found on…(Read More)

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