Spider Mites

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Mites are common pests in landscapes and gardens that feed on many fruit trees, vines, berries, vegetables, and ornamental plants. Although related to insects, mites aren’t insects but members of the arachnid class along with spiders and ticks. Spider mites, also called webspinning mites, are the most common mite pests and among the most ubiquitous of all pests in the garden and on the farm.

IDENTIFICATION

To the naked eye, spider mites look like tiny, moving dots; however, you can see them easily with a 10X hand lens. Spider mites live in colonies, mostly on the undersurfaces of leaves; a single colony may contain hundreds of individuals. The presence of webbing is an easy way to distinguish them from all other types of mites and small insects such as aphids and thrips, which can also infest leaf undersides.

Adult mites have eight legs and an oval body with two red eyespots near the head end. Females usually have a large, dark blotch on each side of the body and numerous bristles covering the legs and body. Immature mites resemble adults (except they are much smaller), and the newly hatched larvae have only six legs. The other immature stages have eight legs. Eggs are spherical and translucent, like tiny droplets, becoming cream colored before hatching.

LIFE CYCLE

In some parts of California, spider mites may feed and reproduce all year on plants that retain their green leaves throughout the winter. In colder areas and on deciduous trees that drop their leaves, webspinning mites overwinter as red or orange mated females under rough bark scales and in ground litter and trash. They begin feeding and laying eggs when warm weather returns in spring.

Spider mites reproduce rapidly in hot weather and commonly become numerous in June through September. If the temperature and food supplies are favorable, a generation can be completed in less than a week. Spider mites prefer hot, dusty conditions and usually are first found on trees or plants adjacent to dusty roadways or at margins of gardens. Plants under water stress also are highly susceptible. As foliage quality declines on heavily infested plants, female mites catch wind currents and disperse to other plants. High mite populations may undergo a rapid decline in late summer when predators overtake them, host plant conditions become unfavorable, and the weather turns cooler as well as following rain.

DAMAGE

Mites cause damage by sucking cell contents from leaves. A small number of mites usually isn’t reason for concern, but very high populations can damage plants, especially herbaceous ones. At first, the damage shows up as a stippling of light dots on the leaves; sometimes the leaves take on a bronze color. As feeding continues, the leaves turn yellowish or reddish and drop off. Often, large amounts of webbing cover leaves, twigs, and fruit. Damage is usually worse when compounded by water stress.

Spider mites have many natural enemies that often limit populations. Adequate irrigation is important, because water-stressed plants are most likely to be damaged. Broad-spectrum insecticide treatments for other pests frequently cause mite outbreaks, so avoid these pesticides when possible.

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